Fire Articles

Articles containing information about the science behind the use of Fire on the islands.

Prescribed pile burns scheduled for Raspberry and Michigan Islands during week of June 13th

Prescribed pile burns scheduled for Raspberry and Michigan Islands during week of June 13th

The National Park Service says piles of accumulated wood debris at the Raspberry and Michigan Island light station cultural landscapes will be burned later this month.   In a statement, the Park Service said, "Weather permitting, prescribed burning of these piles is scheduled during the week of June 13th with the assistance of the National Park Service's Black Hills Fire Module.  Wind, humidity, smoke dispersion and surface moisture will be assessed before igniting any fires.  Please be aware that smoke may be visible." The Park Service said a 19-acre prescribed burn on the Highbush Unit,...

Stockton Island prescribed burn and fuel reductions planned

Stockton Island prescribed burn and fuel reductions planned

BAYFIELD, WISCONSIN (National Park Service News Release) –The National Park Service, in collaboration with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and tribal partners, is planning a 19-acre prescribed burn on Stockton Island (Wiisaakodewan-minis) between May 10th and 26th, if weather conditions permit. The National Park Service uses prescribed burning for vegetation management and to restore cultural landscapes. In 2017 Apostle Islands National Lakeshore collaborated with the Red Cliff Band, Bad River Band and other Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission member Tribes to conduct the...

Past, Present and Future of Fire in the Apostle Islands

Past, Present and Future of Fire in the Apostle Islands

Part 1 with Damon Panek, Apostle Islands NL “For generations, Native people in the Great Lakes region utilized prescribed fire to improve habitat, increase blueberry production, and clear the understory of vegetation. These frequent, low-intensity fires promoted fire adapted and dependent ecosystems. The medicines, species abundance and diversity, and foods created are what our Anishinaabe culture is rooted in. Our way of seeing the world was developed here around this lake and with fire,” said Damon. “Damon integrates Ojibwe culture, language, and history into the park’s education and...